Frequently Asked Questions

What is Step Together?

Step Together is a helpline and digital support service for people looking for advice on how to best support and protect someone from involvement in violent extremism (using violence for social, political or ideological change). We provide a safe space where key support networks can talk through their concerns and find information on how they can help others. Our trained support workers are here to answer your questions, Monday-Friday 9am to 5pm. Free call 1800 875 204.



Who answers the Step Together helpline?

Our helpline is staffed by a team of qualified support workers, specialising in family and community support. They are supervised by a Senior Case Manager, with expertise in Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) engagement and intervention.



Can I call the Step Together helpline and remain anonymous?

Yes, you can request that you remain anonymous as Step Together is a confidential support service.  Providing some information may be necessary in order to get the help you need, but this information is classified as personal information and is stored securely in line with the Department of Communities and Justice’s Privacy Management Plan. Calls are recorded and stored securely and may be used for duty of care, quality and training purposes.  Information may be disclosed to third parties for reports of criminal offences, imminent risk to minors or other immediate risk to safety.  We are also obliged to report serious indictable offences as per section 316 of the Crimes Act 1900.

More information on privacy and rights can be found in the Department of Communities and Justice Privacy Management Plan available in the Step Together Privacy Notice.  



What happens to my information?

Any information we collect is used to give you the best possible assistance with your query and is held in accordance with NSW privacy legislation. As an early intervention service that seeks to provide information and referrals, you can seek information and support from Step Together without the fear of law enforcement being involved. You can also request that your identity not be recorded. However, if we become aware of a serious threat to life, health or safety of yourself or others, or the risk of significant harm to a minor, we will encourage you to contact emergency services or the police and we may need to as well.  We are also obliged to report serious indictable offences as per section 316 of the Crimes Act 1900. More information is available in the Step Together Privacy Notice.  



Is the helpline the same thing as the National Security hotline?

No, unlike the National Security Hotline, Step Together is not a reporting service. We exist to provide help and referrals to services that can assist people who may know someone vulnerable to violent extremism. By helping the support networks of vulnerable people such as family and friends, we provide an early intervention countering violent extremism service that aims to stop people going down the path to violent extremism before it goes too far.

If you believe you have information about terrorist threats you should call the National Security Hotline . If you believe that someone you know is likely to commit a terrorist act imminently, you must call 000 and ask for the Police. 



What if someone is threatening to harm themselves or others?

If someone indicates they are going to harm themselves or other people, and is planning or intending to commit a violent act, this should be taken very seriously and must be acted upon immediately. Please call triple zero (000) as soon as possible.

Freecall 000 immediately to reach police, ambulance or fire services if:

  • Someone is seriously injured or in need of urgent medical help
  • Someone indicates they are going to harm themselves or other people, and is planning or intending to commit a violent act
  • Your life or property is being threatened.
  • You just witnessed a serious accident or crime
  • Someone is threatening self-harm or suicide (you may also want to take them to hospital)

For more visit our “In an Emergency” page.



Does your service offer translation?

To initiate a session with a helpline support worker, a caller should (if possible) advise on their preferred language. The helpline support worker will then place the caller on hold and contact the Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS). The helpline support worker will then reconnect with the caller and the interpreter in a conference call. Alternatively, someone can contact the interpreter first, who can then call the support workers to begin the session.

Our advice and support is most effective when the support worker and caller can communicate as honestly as possible. While we acknowledge that this could sometimes feel awkward when a translator is involved, we encourage you to be as open as you can in order to get the most out of the session. TIS officers are bound by privacy legislation to protect clients’ rights. The usual risk assessments and ethics of providing support apply.



Can I use the National Relay Service?

Yes, our helpline support workers are experienced in working with clients through the National Relay Service (NRS). They will work with the relay officer to provide support and are conscious of obstacles facing people with a disability. They will use a person-centred, strength-based approach to suit their needs.

A support worker will work to get the most out of the session by communicating as openly and directly as possible, almost as if the relay officer is not involved.

NRS officers are bound by privacy legislation to protect clients’ rights. The usual risk assessments and ethics of case work apply.

Was this content useful?
We will use your rating to help improve the site.

Please select a valid option.

Please don't include personal or financial information here

Please select a valid option.

Please don't include personal or financial information here
Thank you for your feedback.
Close



Return to top of page Back to top